Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: TSI alum guest post

Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology: Part Four

By Jenna Gardner   BEFORE YOU WATCH   This is an activity I used with students at the beginning of Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 2 when Viola, disguised as Cesario, realizes that Olivia loves her because Olivia believes Viola to be “the man” she pretends to be.   The beauty of Shakespeare is in… Continue Reading »


Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology: Part Three

By Rachel Jean-Marie   BEFORE YOU WATCH   In this video, you will see a demonstration that provides ideas on how to engage students in a close reading of the text by exploring Shakespeare’s use of language in a specific scene in Twelfth Night using hypertext annotations.  Obviously, it’s good if students have had lessons/practice… Continue Reading »


Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology: Part One

By Gillian Drutchas ***We’re thrilled to bring you another series of teacher-created videos from the Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014. Last month, teachers shared ideas for a Romeo and Juliet unit. This time around, we invite you to watch—and read—their strategies for teaching Twelfth Night with digital technology. Up first: Michigan teacher Gillian Drutchas…***   BEFORE… Continue Reading »


Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Four

By Folger Education Today we bring you an idea for a final project in a Romeo and Juliet unit. Watch how Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher David Fulco blends performance, language study, and digital research in this student-centered assignment. We love how he uses web tools to promote exploratory, independent learning in… Continue Reading »


Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Three

By Folger Education   What does sound editing software have to do with Shakespeare? Let’s find out in the third installment of our teacher-created videos on teaching Romeo and Juliet. Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum Matt Seymour shares a creative, accessible, and engaging approach to teaching iambic pentameter. See how Matt gets his students tinkering… Continue Reading »


Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Two

By Folger Education   Here’s another great teaching video on Act 1 of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this time from Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher Alli Gubanich.   Here’s Alli’s message for you as you watch her iMovie tutorial on using technology and movement to teach language and imagery:   BEFORE YOU… Continue Reading »


Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part One

By Folger Education In July 2014, 25 teachers from all over the country gathered at the Folger for an intensive month-long study of Shakespeare sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities: the Teaching Shakespeare Institute. Working through the lenses of scholarship, performance, and pedagogy, participants completed three major projects: 1) a research paper using… Continue Reading »


Finding a Shakespeare Hook

By Kevin Costa Whenever I begin a Shakespeare play with my students in my two-year course, The Institute for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies at McDonogh School, I get the class working on text from just about Day One. I don’t spend a lot of time setting up with talk about Shakespeare’s life or with the… Continue Reading »


Hamlet's Ophelia: How imagery supports characterization

By Jill Burdick-Zupancic In English 10, I chose to study Macbeth with the students this year. However, because we were also looking at how imagery supports characterization, I decided to get them back into the world of Shakespeare with a look at Gertrude’s recount of Ophelia’s drowning in Hamlet. I’ve recently been really into taking… Continue Reading »


“Take heed, ere summer comes:” Teaching Romeo and Juliet Intensive

Guest post by Michael Klein It didn’t take me long to rethink how to look at Shakespeare texts after listening to Dr. Ann Cook Calhoun compare them to a musical score. “Reading texts sitting at a desk is like looking at musical notations without hearing the instruments” she said during the English-Speaking Union’s Shakespeare Teacher… Continue Reading »