Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: teaching Shakespeare

Shakespeare for Everyone: Working with Students with Severe Disabilities

~by Christopher Shamburg, New Jersey City University Shakespeare can be a powerful tool for the cognitive, emotional, social, and linguistic development of all kids. I saw this phenomenon when working with the students of A. Harry Moore School in Jersey City, a comprehensive school for students ages 3-21 with severe medical, physical, and cognitive disabilities…. Continue Reading »


Igniting a Flame at the Folger's 2013 Elementary Educators' Conference

Folger Educatin Intern Samantha Smith writes about her experience at our Elementary Educators’ Conference On the last day of the 2013 Shakespeare in Elementary Education Conference at the Folger Shakespeare Library, students from Capitol Hill Montessori took to the stage in the Folger Theatre to perform a short play entitled “Much Ado About Shakespeare.”  The… Continue Reading »


Come Play with Us!

There may be snow on the ground, but Spring is in the air at the Folger.  As the Cherry Blossoms in Washington prepare to bloom, so do our local budding Bards as they prepare for the student festivals right around the corner. While the high school students will stomp the boards in just a couple… Continue Reading »


"Shall we go draw our numbers, and set on?"

~by Julia Perlowski (title quote from Henry IV, part 2) In my high school honors English class, my well-meaning teacher decided to have us read Macbeth.  I was thrilled.  I had been in classes where teachers played records of famous Shakespearean monologues read by famous people with thick British accents.   Who can forget “Oh, pardon… Continue Reading »


Teaching Shakespeare FAQs

Teaching Shakespeare can seem daunting, especially if you’re teaching Shakespeare for the first time or if your students are encountering Shakespeare for the first time. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most frequently asked questions. Our experience is that with a little preparation, studying Shakespeare can be fun and rewarding for all students… Continue Reading »


A Crime to Teach Shakespeare as We Do Now

Don’t be alarmed. My headline doesn’t apply to most of you who are followers of this Blog. And I don’t mean to malign or indict  other Shakespeare teachers. So please read on. That headline appeared in an article in the NY Times in 1916 on the 300th commemoration of Shakespeare’s death. Plans are already underway at the Folger… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare in other worlds

Shakespeare is taught all over the world, both in English-speaking and non-English speaking countries. Suzanne Worthington, RSC Education has created the World Shakespeare Classroom Wiki for the 2012 World Shakespeare Festival in London that looks at how Shakespeare is taught around the world.   Here are a few highlights: Algeria: Some students  from Ahmed Lamarchi High School discuss Shakespeare  and do a short… Continue Reading »


All Students Deserve Shakespeare

In my January 5th  Blog entry, Shakespeare in Other Words,  I ranted against using “modernized” or “Shakespeare Made Easy” versions of the plays. But those well-meaning teachers who use those books are at least trying, and I suspect, with a bit of help and some quality professional development, they will toss those books and get… Continue Reading »


Sweets to the Tweets: Farewell.

It all started with a Blog entry I posted here last week called Shakespeare in Other Words.  Suddenly,  Howard Sherman @HESherman and Peter Marks @petermarksdrama took that post to a new direction and began a heated  session on Twitter about the use of modern translations in Shakespeare productions. Before I knew it, Sherman organized a Tweet… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare…in other words

Why are there so many “modern” versions of Shakespeare’s plays? There are plenty of great books that don’t need translated versions. We don’t look for easier versions of Dickens, Hawthorne, Melville, or Fitzgerald (or at least, I hope we don’t.) But re-doing Shakespeare seems to be a favorite sport of publishers. In a way, we… Continue Reading »