Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: teaching Shakespeare

Shakespeare Goes Back to School

[getty src=”180411778?et=j3s2_HtjSaNrmUuAXet4LA&sig=Xs7p-t5Xflh0J8lHEU_TFKqck0xQ7RLMdFglLyKp9T0=” width=”501″ height=”342″]   Yes, it’s that time again for teachers all across the country. So here are some things Shakespeare says about school and learning and teachers. Learning: O Lord, I could have stay’d here all the night To hear good counsel: O, what learning is! Romeo and Juliet: 3.3 O this learning, what a… Continue Reading »


Evidence-Based Argument: Shakespeare and the Common Core

Guest post by Josh Cabat Over the past few weeks, I have had the opportunity to attend both a week-long workshop on reading strategies at Teachers College and the week-long AP English Language and Composition prep course sponsored by the College Board. In so many ways, these two activities are diametrically opposed, certainly in terms… Continue Reading »


This speech of yours hath moved me: The ESU National Shakespeare Competition

Scott Van Wye, a student of Richard Phillipy at Lawrence Central High School in Indianapolis, won first prize at the 31st annual English-Speaking Union National Shakespeare Competition on May 5. Scott performed a speech by Benedick from Much Ado About Nothing and a cold reading from The Tempest in addition to a sonnet. The competition was held at Lincoln Center… Continue Reading »


Killing the Poet in your Classroom

by Gina Voskov One of the courses I teach at my school is 6th grade Humanities, and next up in our year’s curriculum plan is learning about Ancient Greece and Rome. I’m excited about getting the kids up and out of their seats for this class, and the best way I can do that is… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare Flash Mob in your School

In case you’ve forgotten: Tomorrow is Shakespeare’s 450th Birthday. In my recent post I wrote about the Romeo and Juliet Balcony Scene-Flash Mob event that the Folger is hosting on YouTube. We’ve gotten lots of questions and comments about this activity, and we’re hoping that you take the time to get your students to create this scene.


Shakespeare Made Just As Easy

A while back I wrote Shakespeare in Other Words citing the reasons teachers should avoid using “No Fear” or “Made Easy” or any other parallel text edition in their classroom. Needless to say, it generated over 40 comments, including some from an author of “The Shakespeare Novels.” But now I realize that simply dismissing those books wasn’t enough…. Continue Reading »


Common Core standing tall onstage at the Folger

Let’s make a date for another day to have a longer, more nuanced conversation about the many parts of the Common Core. For now, I just want to say that if we could put politics aside and testing aside (and unfortunately, in our beloved field of education, we can put aside neither for long), the… Continue Reading »


Resources for the Shakespeare plays YOU are teaching

Last week, we took a reader poll to ask which Shakespeare plays were being taught this semester. Top of the list (as of this writing): Romeo and Juliet, with more than 25 percent of the vote. Macbeth took second place with 22 percent, and Hamlet third with 10 percent. Our write-in option was also quite… Continue Reading »



Shakespeare In December: They go, they go, look how they go

By David Fulco     As the cold weather sets in, the auditorium in a small school gets used more frequently than before. Where in the fall my Shakespeare Troupe had the run of the auditorium after school, now we split the space with cheerleaders, holiday concerts and even the basketball team, which uses the… Continue Reading »