Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: teaching Shakespeare

YOUR Teaching Epiphanies

As a follow-up to Mark Miazga’s fabulous story about his teaching epiphany, we invited you, our readers, to share revelations from your classrooms, and… wow! You and your students blew us away! Here’s what you had to say:   My epiphany came when I realized that getting students to act and move would impact them… Continue Reading »


My Teaching Epiphany: How to Really Prepare Students for Success

[getty src=”90797773?et=Sh9cJ1VSTepZcnrTaeJsgQ&sig=tZuxcdhxnOwZm7zw2RL6039_fvEN5trNZMXzVL7FJa0=” width=”359″ height=”478″] By Mark Miazga It’s January 6th and many people are celebrating epiphanies today. In keeping with this theme, I’m sharing with you a life-changing discovery I made in my own classroom: a teaching epiphany. I teach at a large urban public high school in Baltimore City, and, like many large public… Continue Reading »


Breaking Down the Barriers of Shakespeare’s Text

Happy holidays, readers! We’ll be on hiatus until January 6, 2015. Check back then for a new post—and have a very merry winter break!   By Sara Lehn    Occasionally, those of us who revere the Bard speak of his works as if they are some sort of holy text. These plays contain such incredible… Continue Reading »


What I Learned from the High School Fellowship: A Teacher’s Notes

By Corinne Viglietta We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity Shakespeare.” Since September, local high schoolers gathered here every Monday to take on big questions and deep learning around Shakespeare and the humanities. They saw productions of King Lear and Julius Caesar and performed… Continue Reading »


Folger Buzz: Overheard at NCTE

By Michael LoMonico  Folger Education was once again a major player at the National Council of Teachers of English conference in November. Since the conference was held just outside Washington, DC, the Folger Shakespeare Library was able to have our largest presence there in years. Here’s some of what we heard: The lucky group of… Continue Reading »


What Julius Caesar Taught Me

by Sam Sherman Folger High School Fellow, Class of 2014 I don’t think I just speak for myself when I say that Shakespeare makes all the more sense when it is performed as opposed to it being examined from text. After all, Shakespeare wrote plays, not novels. Shakespeare wanted actors to play out his work… Continue Reading »


From the AV Vault: Interpreting Character

In honor of #ThrowBackThursday, we’re sharing one of the more popular videos from our Teaching Shakespeare series. Sue Biondo-Hench, a curriculum specialist (and alumna) of the Folger’s Teaching Shakespeare Institute and an English teacher at Carlisle High School for more than 29 years, often starts off a new Shakespeare unit by having students explore character and motive using… Continue Reading »


Teaching Shakespeare: Mini-Research Projects

By Deborah Gascon I set a goal this school year to include several, less time-consuming (but equally as meaningful), mini-research projects into my teaching of literature. Enter resident experts! This quick strategy to get students researching more frequently scaffolds the skills they need to complete the big, scary research paper we assign in the spring. The… Continue Reading »


"The Adventures of Batlet Hamman" and Other Wild Ideas: Shakespeare and Pop Culture

[getty src=”71144558?et=qYiaoUryT9BYRcIU18zAGQ&similar=off&sig=2U6oMC6WOq15_YcCrAPymReujxll6JohSdxFVoDJ8G4=” width=”445″ height=”357″] By Sara Lehn Last year an unforgettable group of my twelfth grade students became fascinated with the connections they saw between Batman and Hamlet.  At first I was skeptical, but the more they defended their beliefs, the more I came around to their way of thinking. Consider: an angry, morose member… Continue Reading »


Letting Shakespeare Speak for Himself

By Mike Klein Year after year kids in my classroom have strikingly similar reactions to my announcement, “Tomorrow, we’ll be starting Shakespeare.” That reaction is usually a series of “Ughs,” or “Oh nos!” or “Whys?” The most dreaded by English teachers everywhere is, of course, “I hate Shakespeare!” Perhaps I am different, perhaps I’m a… Continue Reading »