Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: Sara Lehn

Differentiating Shakespeare: Text Analysis with Crayons

In ten short years as an educator, I have taught every grade from sixth through twelfth, and every level of ability from AP to self-contained special ed.  I say this not to impress you with how many different preps I have tackled in ten years, but to highlight this fact: I teach Shakespeare to every… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare Clubs: What we are and what we may be

“Who would you choose?  Benedict Cumberbatch or Michael Fassbender?” “Cumberbatch!” “But have you seen the new Michael Fassbender trailer?  It looks amazing!”   It is the first meeting of the school year for my Shakespeare Society’s Executive Board.  Although it has been months since we all met, our table is brimming with enthusiasm, excitement, and… Continue Reading »


Building Characterization With Music

[getty src=”170956814?et=MuEFNJq5S0x65ONObTmEcQ&similar=on&sig=O8jSoY6buJP7_7cyTcGBgKSzDaH8mYevAfNwW8QMGFw=” width=”507″ height=”338″] By Sara Lehn Teachers have long taken advantage of students’ love of music as a tool for the classroom, writing catchy tunes to act as mnemonic devices, playing educational songs and music videos, and so on.  Watch students in the hallway or cafeteria and you will inevitably find them with headphones blaring,… Continue Reading »


"The Adventures of Batlet Hamman" and Other Wild Ideas: Shakespeare and Pop Culture

[getty src=”71144558?et=qYiaoUryT9BYRcIU18zAGQ&similar=off&sig=2U6oMC6WOq15_YcCrAPymReujxll6JohSdxFVoDJ8G4=” width=”445″ height=”357″] By Sara Lehn Last year an unforgettable group of my twelfth grade students became fascinated with the connections they saw between Batman and Hamlet.  At first I was skeptical, but the more they defended their beliefs, the more I came around to their way of thinking. Consider: an angry, morose member… Continue Reading »


Quartos and Folios in the English Classroom

By Sara Lehn “Stand, who is that?” “Tis I.” “Who’s there?” “Nay, answer me.  Stand and unfold yourself.” What’s the difference between the two exchanges above?  Either not much or quite a lot, depending on your perspective.  Both indicate two people looking to identify each other.  Therefore, both imply a certain level of curiosity or… Continue Reading »