Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Macbeth at the Movies

Having a sneak peek behind the scenes of a theatrical production is always exciting. The special features on the DVD of the 2008 Folger/Two River production of Macbeth – designed especially with students and teachers in mind – reveal some of the thought processes and deliberations that went on before rehearsals began. Some features also… Continue Reading »


Just another Fairie?

In the age of  more and more Tinkerbell movies(yes there’s another one coming soon), one can understand an elementary educator’s propensity towards producing A Midsummer Night’s Dream with their students. Young girls can be quite drawn to the idea of putting on those fairy wings and singing a sweet lullaby to their Queen. Budding young actors love the… Continue Reading »


Vampires, Zombies, and Shakespeare

Vampire mania has taken over the world. It seems that other supernatural creatures are not far behind them. And all of this is particularly prevalent among the younger, Twilight-adoring, Edward-vs-Jacob crowd (Although perhaps there has always been an allure towards vampires: I will admit, I loved The Lost Boys and Interview with a Vampire in… Continue Reading »


Henry VIII: All is True?

After an incredible summer with the Teaching Shakespeare Institute, the Folger has been overtaken by Tudor-mania! The current exhibition, Vivat Rex!, commemorates the 500th anniversary of Henry’s ascension to the throne of England, and the Theatre is rehearsing Shakespeare’s Henry VIII, also known as All is True. With all the pop-culture fervor for the polygamist king, it… Continue Reading »


A Teacher Prepares

School begins soon, my vacation shortened by the intense summer I spent at the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Teaching Shakespeare Institute. As these drowsy days transform to hectic autumn, I wonder how I will use the TSI experience in my classroom. Over the past few years, I have relied on Shakespeare Set Free to teach Romeo… Continue Reading »


Litmus Test for Romeo and Juliet

My litmus test for a good production of Romeo and Juliet is whether or not the beauty of the balcony scene can help me forget—for the moment—Act 5.