Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Come Play with Us!

There may be snow on the ground, but Spring is in the air at the Folger.  As the Cherry Blossoms in Washington prepare to bloom, so do our local budding Bards as they prepare for the student festivals right around the corner. While the high school students will stomp the boards in just a couple… Continue Reading »


Action is Eloquence

~ by Danette Long I recently had the pleasure of working with 20 pre-service English teachers at Montana State University in beautiful Bozeman, MT.  My purpose for working with the students was to discuss methods for teaching Shakespeare in secondary education.  I should begin by saying that this is a topic near and dear to… Continue Reading »


All the World’s a Stage

~by Jessica Lander (re-printed with permission) How does one translate “All the World’s A Stage” into the ancient language of Khmer? Once again I have found myself teaching Shakespeare in an unusual environment.  Last year in Boston, I explored the elements of the story with 6th graders and probed the emotional transformation of the bard’s characters… Continue Reading »


“Here will we sit and let the sounds of music creep in our ears…”

How do you connect Shakespeare with culture and history? Those of us teaching Shakespeare to young people in the classroom are tasked with not only making learning interesting but also relevant. In observance of Black History Month, we want to pay tribute to the work of legendary jazz musician, Duke Ellington. Ellington was a legendary… Continue Reading »


Play, Play, Play

~by Kevin J. Costa Sometimes I wonder if the performance-based approach to teaching Shakespeare, which we promote at the Folger, is seen only as an “entry-level” tool for students and teachers intimidated by Shakespeare. For sure, this is a major audience. But performance-based work on Shakespeare doesn’t have to stop there. In fact, I think… Continue Reading »


Osmotically Speaking: Shakespeare as Writing Teacher

On more than one occasion, students in my Shakespeare class have told me that studying Shakespeare has made them better writers. That thought pleases and intrigues me, and it also inspired me to offer my students a writing challenge. I asked each one to write in a genre of his/her own choosing and to allow… Continue Reading »