Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Shakespeare Festivals: Getting Students On Their Feet

Something very special happens when you have students up on their feet, with Shakespeare’s language in their mouths, performing for each other, and learning from each other. That’s what we try to make happen each year at our Secondary School Shakespeare Festival. In March, we’re bringing together 48 schools, with students in grades 7-12, from… Continue Reading »


Master Class Musings: Success!

Last month, Folger Education streamed a live master class on Teaching Romeo and Juliet. Hundreds of teachers participated, and afterward we asked for your feedback. The response was so positive! Many of the teachers surveyed said they appreciated the well-rounded approach embodied by our three video segments on scholarship, performance, and the classroom. Here’s a… Continue Reading »


Adapting Macbeth in Thailand: The Thane and I

Guest post by Jessica Lander The large dented cauldrons of spicy green curry, red curry and duck soup were cloaked in hovering fog and steamy air of the monsoon season.  It was evening at the Gate Market in the heart of the old city of Chiang Mai, in Northern Thailand. As I slurped a bowl… Continue Reading »


Happy New Year!

With 2013 behind us, we review some of our most popular posts from the year: How To Teach Your Children Shakespeare Author Ken Ludwig introduces his children to Shakespeare using particular passages, which he puts in context for them and then has them memorize. His new book shares these techniques and strategies with parents and educators…. Continue Reading »


It's Almost Christmas

We’re turning back the clock a few years, to revisit a blog post from Christmas 2009, written by Mike LoMonico. ‘Tis the season to be jolly and maybe think about Shakespeare.  Here are a few tidbits for your holiday pleasure.


Teacher Tuesday: Shakespeare and Flipped Classrooms

Flipped classrooms are getting a lot of buzz right now. Can the model be used to successfully teach Shakespeare? In a flipped classroom, instruction is offered during homework time (often in the form of short videos online), and teachers focus more on implementation activities while students are in the classroom. Advocates say that students engage… Continue Reading »