Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Technology-in-the-classroom

Filming the Text

~by Rick Vanderwall My fall semester Introduction to Literature students were a great group. This course is a required, entry level lit course for first year students.  Everybody takes this course and instructors are encouraged to develop unique, engaging themes for the course. I came up with “Journeys through Danger, Temptation, and Violence”. Although this… Continue Reading »


Folger Digital Editions and Lesson Plans Linked!

Twelve of Shakespeare’s plays, including Hamlet, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth, The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night were made available in digital format earlier this month by the Folger Shakespeare Library.  The response has been tremendously… Continue Reading »


Announcing the Folger Digital Texts!

We’re all talking about it, because we’re so excited that this resource is now available for the world to use! Folger Digital Texts are here! Currently featuring 12 of the most popular of Shakespeare’s plays, over the course of the next year we’re planning to see all of Shakespeare’s plays and poems, and a few… Continue Reading »


Look to Like Us!

Folger Education is proud to announce that we have branched into our own Facebook Page this week! Over the past year or so, different divisions of the Folger have been branching from the parent Folger Library page to give more specific information of interest to their audience. Maybe you’ve already Liked all of the Folger… Continue Reading »


It's-a Me! Petruchio!

Today’s post is an extra dose of “Just for Fun.” (For those of you who aren’t sure what that is, sign up now for BardNotes: our monthly e-newsletter for educators!) Yesterday I learned that one of the most iconic voices in entertainment for this generation got his inspiration from having played Petruchio in The Taming of the… Continue Reading »


Thee, thou, and you: Pronouns in the Sonnets Day 5 of TSI

During this month’s Teaching Shakespeare Institute, some of our Summer Scholars have chosen to blog their experiences on their own sites, and have given permission to share some of them here. Today we’ll look back on yesterday’s very full day of activities with Greta Brasgalla: And we are back for another week!  Today was a… Continue Reading »


@Hamlet: Twitter in the Classroom

The internet is a growing teaching resource and tool, especially when approaching Shakespeare and literature. Digital Theatre projects like Such Tweet Sorrow and Much Ado About N<3thing doubled as insights into familiar characters as well as cautionary tales regarding responsibility, communication, and cyber-bullying. We’ve discussed Twitter and Facebook’s influence on student–teacher communication before, but one teacher has… Continue Reading »


Don't Miss Out On "Experiencing Shakespeare"

Only two weeks to go before “Experiencing Shakespeare”, Folger Education’s first electronic field trip, brings thousands of students in grades 6-12 to the Folger Shakespeare Library. Are you registered? If not, click here to register for this free one-hour program. I wrote about the program in a February 7th blog posting, and it occurred to… Continue Reading »


Experiencing Shakespeare: An Electronic Field Trip to the Folger Shakespeare Library

“Speak the speech, I pray you, … trippingly on the tongue,”  Hamlet’s advice to the players. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOZQoeMRMhc&w=560&h=315] When teachers assign their students to perform a scene from a play by William Shakespeare, what should their students do to get ready?  How can teachers best support their students in preparing their scenes?  Steer them away from “translated”… Continue Reading »


New Year, Same Class, New Ideas?

Happy New Year! As we tear into a new Gregorian calendar, we celebrate new beginnings, fresh starts, and new goals. But we returned to our offices and classrooms today to continue a school-year already in progress. How can we infuse our lesson plans with the same fresh fervor as we intend to apply to our… Continue Reading »