Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeares-plays

HAMLET: In Performance

April is Hamlet month this year at the Folger! Our upcoming performance, opening April 21st, has us so excited for the Bard’s Greatest Tragedy! The play has been examined in a myriad of ways, so instead of trying to cram it all into one entry I will begin with notable performances of Hamlet. Hamlet recently… Continue Reading »


Lord, what fools these mortals be!

The first of April, some do say Is set apart for All Fool’s Day; But why the people call it so Nor I, nor they themselves, do know, But on this day are people sent On purpose for pure merriment. – Anonymous What better day to discuss Shakespeare’s Fools than April 1. So here are some… Continue Reading »


In the Springtime, the Only Pretty Ringtime

Spring has Sprung here at the Folger, and with it rehearsals for next month’s exciting performances of HAMLET, and preparations for Shakespeare’s Birthday Open House on April 25th and the Children’s Festival in May! To celebrate, here are some springtime quotes from the ol’ Bard to put you in a blooming mood! It was a lover and his… Continue Reading »


Examples Galore!

A picture is worth a thousand words… on Tuesday, I wrote about the wealth of possibilities that lie in students working on illumination projects using Shakespeare’s text. But better to show than tell! Below are a few examples of some of the work that students have done in Folger’s High School Fellowship Program. And to… Continue Reading »


Teaching with the Folger Macbeth DVD

We’d like to learn what you early adopters of the DVD think about it and more importantly, we’d like you to tell us how you might use the play and the Special Features in teaching Macbeth. Try to be as specific as you can. We’re really curious how you might teach the play if every one of your students had the book WITH the DVD.


Extra Credit Reading: Macbeth

With the recent release of the Folger’s Macbeth DVD Edition, I’m reminded of the wealth of inspiration to be taken from sources outside the play itself. Building a character as complex as Lady Macbeth who “is just known as the epitome of evil, this battleaxe of a possessed demonic dark force woman” (described by Kate… Continue Reading »