Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeares-plays

Shakespeare Flash Mob in your School

In case you’ve forgotten: Tomorrow is Shakespeare’s 450th Birthday. In my recent post I wrote about the Romeo and Juliet Balcony Scene-Flash Mob event that the Folger is hosting on YouTube. We’ve gotten lots of questions and comments about this activity, and we’re hoping that you take the time to get your students to create this scene.


But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? …'tis a Flash Mob!

  As you probably know, April 23 is Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, and the Folger Education staff wants to get everyone involved in the celebration. So we are hosting a Balcony Scene Flash Mob Festival. It’s simple. It’s fun.  And it will get a lot of people speaking Shakespeare. We hope to get groups from all across the… Continue Reading »


Featured Lesson Plan: The Bullies and the Bullied in Shakespeare's Plays

Today we’re featuring a lesson plan from among the highest rated teaching modules on our website. It’s written by Kevin J. Costa, a 2010 Teaching Shakespeare Institute alum and an English teacher at McDonogh School in Owings Mills, MD, where he also serves as Director of Fine & Performing Arts. Read Costa’s introduction to this… Continue Reading »


Resources for the Shakespeare plays YOU are teaching

Last week, we took a reader poll to ask which Shakespeare plays were being taught this semester. Top of the list (as of this writing): Romeo and Juliet, with more than 25 percent of the vote. Macbeth took second place with 22 percent, and Hamlet third with 10 percent. Our write-in option was also quite… Continue Reading »


#FolgerOfficeHours and The Winter's Tale

Last Thursday the Folger Education department took to Twitter for our second “office hours” session to talk with teachers about how they’re teaching Shakespeare. We love having an informal time to interact with you, answer your questions, and find out what your students are working on. Here’s a great question we received from James Evans: @FolgerED Creating resources for Winter's Tale…. Continue Reading »


Richard III: Science class meets history class meets English class

Until earlier this fall, I was clearly the one in love with words, literature, classrooms, teachers’ lounges, theatre.  Math and science not so much.  OK, so my grade in Biology as a college freshman was D.  Not so interested in photosynthesis. Still not the least bit interested in photosynthesis, but now I am crazily interested… Continue Reading »


Cutting Shakespeare and Untangling Iambic Pentameter

On Thursday, we hosted our first Folger “office hours” – a digital opportunity for you to bring your questions about teaching Shakespeare. And we got some good ones! The theme was Romeo and Juliet, but we also had some lively discussion going about more general topics, like iambic pentameter. If you’re interested in seeing all… Continue Reading »


Peggy Says: A Walk on the Wild Side

Lots of buzz around the Folger these days because Janet Griffin, Artistic Producer of the Folger Theatre, and Robert Richmond, director of our upcoming production of Richard III, are taking a walk on the wild side. You know about the theatre here, right?  Background in case you don’t:  Folks here sometimes call the Folger Theatre… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare In December: They go, they go, look how they go

By David Fulco     As the cold weather sets in, the auditorium in a small school gets used more frequently than before. Where in the fall my Shakespeare Troupe had the run of the auditorium after school, now we split the space with cheerleaders, holiday concerts and even the basketball team, which uses the… Continue Reading »


Master Class Musings: Success!

Last month, Folger Education streamed a live master class on Teaching Romeo and Juliet. Hundreds of teachers participated, and afterward we asked for your feedback. The response was so positive! Many of the teachers surveyed said they appreciated the well-rounded approach embodied by our three video segments on scholarship, performance, and the classroom. Here’s a… Continue Reading »