Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeares-plays

Tech Tips: To Build Close Reading Skills, Teach Annotation

[getty src=”171586213?et=B-HX_EumSmNjmVfKl78yyw&sig=mn8UoAuj4ZE8K8xAiNN1Vj6BVQlGhGtDTsqgoWOmXoE=” width=”509″ height=”337″] By Dana Huff In order to help students develop close reading skills, we teach them how to annotate. Annotation has traditionally been thought of as a pencil-and-paper activity, but e-readers, such as Kindle and iBooks, have great annotation tools. However, website annotation has been more of a challenge for students since… Continue Reading »


The Action to the Word: Gesture as Close Reading

By Kevin J. Costa This past June, I attended the Michael Chekhov Association’s annual International Conference and Workshop in New London, CT. MICHA is an international organization that offers, among other things, intensive actor training each summer for people interested in Chekhov’s psycho-physical approach to the art of acting. While Chekhov’s approach owes considerable debt… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare and Performance-Based Assessment

As you may have guessed, we never get tired of reading about the creative ways teachers are using performance-based learning techniques to teach Shakespeare. Sarah Goodis-Orenstein, a middle school language arts teacher and department head in a public charter school in Brooklyn, recently shared in a blog post on Education Week how she’s experimented with the Folger’s Shakespeare… Continue Reading »


Listening to Shakespeare's Plays

  Performance helps bring Shakespeare alive, and listening to his words being spoken brings them off the page and into a new relevance for students. With the Folger Shakespeare Library launching a new series of Shakespeare audio editions, teachers now have access to unabridged texts from the gold standard Folger Editions performed by a full… Continue Reading »


The Insider's Guide to Hamlet

  The Shakespeare’s Globe production of Hamlet is on tour–heading to every country in the world–and it’s stopping at the Folger Shakespeare Library later this month. Therefore, we thought this would be an opportune time to revisit an invaluable teaching resource created by the Folger, the Insider’s Guide to Hamlet. The Insider’s Guide is a multimedia experience… Continue Reading »


Seeing Double in the Romeo and Juliet Prologue

By Julia Perlowski If the use of Shakespeare’s early modern English is under attack in some “regular” and “honors” English classrooms, just think about what the reaction might be to the use of such rigorous text in an Intensive Reading class! At Pompano Beach High School, I am not only the ONLY drama teacher, I… Continue Reading »


Hamlet's Ophelia: How imagery supports characterization

By Jill Burdick-Zupancic In English 10, I chose to study Macbeth with the students this year. However, because we were also looking at how imagery supports characterization, I decided to get them back into the world of Shakespeare with a look at Gertrude’s recount of Ophelia’s drowning in Hamlet. I’ve recently been really into taking… Continue Reading »


R&J Flash Mobs Across North America

In a recent post, I requested that schools, theaters, or anyone else should stage a flash mob for the “balcony scene” from Romeo and Juliet, with a script created using Folger Digital Texts. Well, the deadline has passed, and we’ve had 28 fabulous submissions. They come from Punahou School in Hawaii; from the University of Northern… Continue Reading »


Friends, Romans, Teachers: Send Me Your Speeches

by Chris Lavold A speech or communications class can be the perfect setting for a small dose of Shakespeare to get the students comfortable with being in front of their peers and completing a close reading of a text.  When my class begins persuasive speaking, I try to make time to spend a day or… Continue Reading »


Killing the Poet in your Classroom

by Gina Voskov One of the courses I teach at my school is 6th grade Humanities, and next up in our year’s curriculum plan is learning about Ancient Greece and Rome. I’m excited about getting the kids up and out of their seats for this class, and the best way I can do that is… Continue Reading »