Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeares-plays

Holiday Hiatus for the Blog—but Forsooth! Buzzes On!

Teaching Colleagues, Happy holidays to you and yours! We hope the season brings you abundant peace and joy. The Teaching Shakespeare! blog will be taking a short winter break until January 10th, at which point we’ll return with new teaching resources. Think you’ll have a Shakespeare teaching emergency before then? Or maybe you just want… Continue Reading »

NCTE Session Spotlight: Hamlet—and a Happy Hour, Too!

If you’re heading to St. Louis for NCTE 2017, please join us for tons of resources and strategies for teaching that beautiful beast, Hamlet. Everyone is invited to all of our sessions and activities, including the last of our five Friday sessions, “Student Close-read Hamlet by Putting It on Its Feet.” Bonus: come to our… Continue Reading »

NCTE Session Spotlight: What Matters Most When We Teach Othello—and What to Do in Class

Today we highlight our NCTE 2017 session that deals directly with teaching language that is tough in lots of ways—cognitively, racially, socially, emotionally. What Matters Most When We Teach Othello—and What to Do in Class How do we as teachers confront the issues that we cannot afford not to confront? How do we facilitate difficult conversations… Continue Reading »

NCTE Session Spotlight: Teaching Thought and Action in Macbeth

It’s time to spotlight the second of our five NCTE convention sessions: Teaching Thought and Action in Macbeth—Soliloquies, Cauldrons, and More! Read all about this hands-on session below, and if you can’t make it to St. Louis this year, stay connected to all of the action by following us on Twitter (@FolgerED and #NCTE17). We’ll… Continue Reading »

CrossTalk Featured Lesson: The Power of Asides

Editor’s Note: Over the next few months, we’ll be highlighting individual lessons from our CrossTalk education project, Essential Everyday Bravery: Thinking and Talking about Identity and Difference in Your Classroom. To learn more, check out the CrossTalk webpage. Today’s lesson comes from Baltimore teacher Amber Phelps, who gets students thinking deeply about identity and vulnerability… Continue Reading »

Teaching King Lear in Times of Grief

It was the start of term 2 in 2016 and I was preparing the Grade 12 students for our study of King Lear. We read an excerpt from The Little Prince. It was meant to introduce big questions around blindness, appearance, and reality. We used the line, ‘It is only with the heart that one… Continue Reading »

Three Ways to Have Fun with Shakespeare

Listening to students speaking Shakespeare is certainly my favorite part of teaching Shakespeare, but I also love watching them play games. We’ve often ended a semester with Shakespeare-based games. (Perfect for this sunny time of year!) Student favorites have been “Who am I?” and “Group Charades,” though “Who said that when?” can be good learning… Continue Reading »

Thirteen Reasons Why Not: Shakespeare, Netflix, and a Teachable Moment

As a participant in the four-week Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2016, I undertook academic research that took me deep into Shakespeare’s language and the Reading Rooms of the Folger. I was intrigued by the role marriage played in two of the plays we studied, Othello and The Merchant of Venice—especially the manner in which particular women… Continue Reading »

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