Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeare/teaching-shakespeare-2

Reading Shakespeare Makes You Smarter?

An article by Robert McCrum of the The Observer, now a bit dated since it hails from April, scratches the surface of the idea that the process of reading Shakespeare ostensibly makes you smarter! Studies by Prof. Phillip Davis of Liverpool University have found through neurological analysis by MRI scanning that “functional shifts of syntax in Shakespeare… Continue Reading »


How Young is Too Young?

We’ve had quite a focus lately on Shakespeare for Kids. The question for a lot of teachers, though, is how early can students begin studying Shakespeare? What do you think?


Where nothing wants that want itself doth seek…

Your school books are packed, the desks cleaned, the chalkboard (or smartboard) cleaner than it’s been since August. You close the books on another school year. We, too, are closing the books on the 2010-2011 school year, and we look forward to new faces, places, and things to try next year! As we prepare, we… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare as a Second Language

~by Holly Rodgers Educators often face the difficult task of engaging students who are increasingly distracted by the fast-paced technology driven society in which we live.  Although Elizabethan times moved at a slower pace, Shakespeare faced the same daunting challenge as teachers today, keeping the attention of such a diverse population. While Shakespeare’s audience differed more… Continue Reading »


Proof that Elementary Students Have FUN with Shakespeare!

Jennifer Ventimiglia’s classroom at Paul Public Charter School in Washington, DC is alive with literary inspiration in the form  of books, posters, and most importantly to us Shakespeare! Ms. Venti’s 6th grade English as a Second Language students have been studying Shakespeare all year long with our Shakespeare Steps Out  program. Beyond that they have… Continue Reading »


"For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring."

The temperature is going up and up and up these days, proof that summer is here even though school is still in session. Students are restless to be outside (or at least not at their desks), and I have a feeling the teachers are, too! If you’re looking for some Shakespeare class activities to fit… Continue Reading »


Teach Shakespeare – Before It's Too Late!

~by Barbara Cobb When I was starting my work on Shakespeare in the schools, I asked a cognitive psychologist with whom I collaborate, “at what age do children have the greatest facility with different dialects, like Shakespeare’s early modern English?” Her response surprised me just a little: “around the age of 9,” she said, “and… Continue Reading »


Summer and Shakespeare

“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” writes the Bard.  With summer approaching, we’re probably all thinking about spending some lazy days on the beach or in the backyard, enjoying being outside of the classroom and away from all of the administrative tasks that come with teaching.  While summer is a time for resting and recharging ourselves after… Continue Reading »


Does Anyone Teach the Sonnets?

We spend a great deal of time talking about teaching Shakespeare’s plays, but not much about the sonnets.  Until recently, we  hadn’t paid as much attention to teaching sonnets as we might have on our website of resources for teachers.  This month, Folger Education rolled out a series of new web pages devoted to the… Continue Reading »


Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.

We’re noticing something around the internet lately: educators are using contemporary music to enhance lesson plans. This may not be up-to-the-minute news. A lot of us remember at least this scene from Renaissance Man starring Danny DeVito where the class of military privates presents the summary of Hamlet as a rap. Or the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s interpretation… Continue Reading »