Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeare/teaching-shakespeare-2

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week!

I’d like to dedicate today’s blog post to recognizing YOU, Educators. May 7-11 is Teacher Appreciation Week in the US. Maybe some of you have some fresh, shiny apples on your desk as a show of appreciation from your students! We appreciate your hard work collecting materials and resources for your classroom – however big… Continue Reading »


Bard-Art

Sometimes before jumping into the physical art of performance, we like to explore other media with students to expand their discussion of Shakespeare. We’ve mentioned the myriad of ways students approach an Illumination Project in our High School Fellowship Program, shown you examples of “remixing” Shakespeare’s text with audio effects, tried our hand at animating… Continue Reading »


These People in This Room at This Time

~by Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger A few weeks ago, I was able to sit in on a read through of Taming of the Shrew. I know the play; I knew the lines. But listening to those actors in that room on that day, the language really came alive for me. The actors brought parts of… Continue Reading »


@Hamlet: Twitter in the Classroom

The internet is a growing teaching resource and tool, especially when approaching Shakespeare and literature. Digital Theatre projects like Such Tweet Sorrow and Much Ado About N<3thing doubled as insights into familiar characters as well as cautionary tales regarding responsibility, communication, and cyber-bullying. We’ve discussed Twitter and Facebook’s influence on student–teacher communication before, but one teacher has… Continue Reading »


A Crime to Teach Shakespeare as We Do Now

Don’t be alarmed. My headline doesn’t apply to most of you who are followers of this Blog. And I don’t mean to malign or indict  other Shakespeare teachers. So please read on. That headline appeared in an article in the NY Times in 1916 on the 300th commemoration of Shakespeare’s death. Plans are already underway at the Folger… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare in other worlds

Shakespeare is taught all over the world, both in English-speaking and non-English speaking countries. Suzanne Worthington, RSC Education has created the World Shakespeare Classroom Wiki for the 2012 World Shakespeare Festival in London that looks at how Shakespeare is taught around the world.   Here are a few highlights: Algeria: Some students  from Ahmed Lamarchi High School discuss Shakespeare  and do a short… Continue Reading »


More to Fear from "No Fear"

By this point, you know what the Folger Education stance on ‘No Fear’ and Translated editions of Shakespeare’s plays is. Don’t use them – they’re not Shakespeare. (See Here, Here, and Here if you missed that message.) Pickens County public schools in South Carolina, USA, has given us another good reason not to use them:  Parents… Continue Reading »


Don't Miss Out On "Experiencing Shakespeare"

Only two weeks to go before “Experiencing Shakespeare”, Folger Education’s first electronic field trip, brings thousands of students in grades 6-12 to the Folger Shakespeare Library. Are you registered? If not, click here to register for this free one-hour program. I wrote about the program in a February 7th blog posting, and it occurred to… Continue Reading »


Subconscious Shakespeare

Odds are that in a classroom of students who have never been taught Shakespeare before, the majority of them may already be at least a little familiar with some aspect of his work. I have no statistical proof to back that statement up, but it does seem likely that in a world where passionate couples are referred… Continue Reading »


Experiencing Shakespeare: An Electronic Field Trip to the Folger Shakespeare Library

“Speak the speech, I pray you, … trippingly on the tongue,”  Hamlet’s advice to the players. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOZQoeMRMhc&w=560&h=315] When teachers assign their students to perform a scene from a play by William Shakespeare, what should their students do to get ready?  How can teachers best support their students in preparing their scenes?  Steer them away from “translated”… Continue Reading »