Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeare/teaching-shakespeare-2

Inside the Classroom: Students Share How They Really Feel about Starting a Shakespeare Unit

In this special series we’re calling “Inside the Classroom,” we’ll follow middle school teacher Gina Voskov and her students as they embark on a Twelfth Night unit. Today, it’s all about pre-reading—check back for notes from the group throughout the learning process. By: Gina Voskov I am so pleased to introduce Won Jae, Lois, and Alexandra,… Continue Reading »


4 Free and Fabulous Folger Resources You Shouldn't Miss

By Corinne Viglietta It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus… Continue Reading »


More Great Ways to Start a Shakespeare Unit

By Folger Education Thanks, teaching colleagues, for sharing your responses to our last post! From technology to performance, here are some of YOUR suggestions for getting started with Shakespeare. Enjoy! Last year the following worked beautifully to engage students with the Prologue to R&J. Start off with pairs saying the same sentence but alternating which… Continue Reading »


5 Great Ways to Start a Shakespeare Unit

by Corinne Viglietta   New semester, new plays! A lot of teachers are kicking off, or getting ready to kick off, a Shakespeare unit, so we thought we’d talk about what to do on those first days. From having students put some verse on its feet to creating a tempest in the lunchroom, these activities… Continue Reading »


Creative Midterms: Assessing Process and Performance

By Jill Burdick-Zupancic   Midterms. This word always evokes a bit of panic in my mind. It feels like some kind of “super assessment” I’m expected to give to my students. Even in my seventh year as an educator, it’s a jarring word; however, the past three years, since my experience at the Teaching Shakespeare Institute… Continue Reading »


YOUR Teaching Epiphanies, Part 2

The epiphanies continue! Today is the anniversary of the death of Irish writer James Joyce, whose famous epiphanies, a century later, still inspire conversation and inquiry. (Plus, did you know that Hamlet was a major source for Joyce, who gave a series of lectures on Shakespeare?) We think it’s fitting, then, today, to offer a second installment of your teaching… Continue Reading »


My Teaching Epiphany: How to Really Prepare Students for Success

[getty src=”90797773?et=Sh9cJ1VSTepZcnrTaeJsgQ&sig=tZuxcdhxnOwZm7zw2RL6039_fvEN5trNZMXzVL7FJa0=” width=”359″ height=”478″] By Mark Miazga It’s January 6th and many people are celebrating epiphanies today. In keeping with this theme, I’m sharing with you a life-changing discovery I made in my own classroom: a teaching epiphany. I teach at a large urban public high school in Baltimore City, and, like many large public… Continue Reading »


Breaking Down the Barriers of Shakespeare’s Text

Happy holidays, readers! We’ll be on hiatus until January 6, 2015. Check back then for a new post—and have a very merry winter break!   By Sara Lehn    Occasionally, those of us who revere the Bard speak of his works as if they are some sort of holy text. These plays contain such incredible… Continue Reading »


Folger Buzz: Overheard at NCTE

By Michael LoMonico  Folger Education was once again a major player at the National Council of Teachers of English conference in November. Since the conference was held just outside Washington, DC, the Folger Shakespeare Library was able to have our largest presence there in years. Here’s some of what we heard: The lucky group of… Continue Reading »


What Julius Caesar Taught Me

by Sam Sherman Folger High School Fellow, Class of 2014 I don’t think I just speak for myself when I say that Shakespeare makes all the more sense when it is performed as opposed to it being examined from text. After all, Shakespeare wrote plays, not novels. Shakespeare wanted actors to play out his work… Continue Reading »