Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Introducing-shakespeare

How to convince your students that Shakespeare's language is accessible

During our first office hours on Twitter last week, we received this question: @FolgerED How does one get buy in through the language, when it’s a language irrelevant to modern pop culture?#folgerofficehours We needed to know more, of course . . . so the middle school teacher who had asked it clarified in a second tweet… Continue Reading »


Just Say Yes

~by Jessica Lander On the grass behind the theater – once a fire station – two teenagers embraced each other and slow-danced.  They wore sheepish grins as they took each other’s hands, swaying and revolving to the music.  Iron & Wine and Graffiti6 and Elliot Smith floated from my portable speakers.  Curious dog walkers with… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Techniques for Starting Shakespeare

For the next few weeks, we’ll be running a feature on one of our favorite online resources: our Teacher to Teacher videos! In these short clips, teachers share their favorite Shakespeare plays, ideas for teaching, and resources for the modern classroom. This week, let’s start generally with ideas for introducing your students to Shakespeare. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyqliiGJP6o&w=560&h=315] First… Continue Reading »


Ay, there's the point… over there.

Yesterday I stumbled upon this video from Australia’s ABC in 2011 about Shakespeare and his hip relevance to today’s audience. Excited, I started the video, and felt my face twist into a confused squint. A lot of their statements are great! Shakespeare was a great writer. His plays have survived for centuries. His language can… Continue Reading »


"With every minute you do change a mind,"

Every year the schools participating in our local outreach programs, Shakespeare Steps Out  and Shakespeare for a New Generation, have to select one of Shakespeare’s plays to perform at their respective Festivals. There are always the big populars: Midsummer, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet – but sometimes the teachers are looking for something a little different, or something they… Continue Reading »


Tragedies… for Kids!

Earlier this week we were approached by a performing group who was going to use Romeo and Juliet for the first time with their young audience. They were concerned with how to tell the end of the story without being too disturbing or too blase – getting the lesson across without traumatizing their audience. We’ve been… Continue Reading »


Grammatical Flourishes with Shakespeare

~by Emily DenBleyker I am not a teacher. I dropped my education major my first semester of college, and I have never looked back. And yet, somehow, in the funny way that life seems to happen to us, I ended up scheduled to teach a writing class for 8-10 year-olds at the day camp where… Continue Reading »


Igniting a Flame at the Folger's 2013 Elementary Educators' Conference

Folger Educatin Intern Samantha Smith writes about her experience at our Elementary Educators’ Conference On the last day of the 2013 Shakespeare in Elementary Education Conference at the Folger Shakespeare Library, students from Capitol Hill Montessori took to the stage in the Folger Theatre to perform a short play entitled “Much Ado About Shakespeare.”  The… Continue Reading »


6th-Grade Puppeteers Meet Master Shakespeare

~by Susan Lucille Davis Some decades ago, the little girl I used to be sat on her bed and listened intently, enthralled by the words that came from her sister’s mouth as she read her homework aloud.  “Double, double, toil and trouble…” Listening to the magic of those words ultimately led me to become a… Continue Reading »


Suit the Action to the Word

I’ve seen this activity done with many different audiences of students (and teachers), and it always makes me smile. The energy and creativity each participating group brings changes the activity slightly each time, adapting it to their interests and thoughts! As seen in the opening moments of this video about our elementary outreach program, Shakespeare… Continue Reading »