Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Humanities-education

"Kate the Curst"

~by Kate Eastwood Norris currently in the role of Katherina Minola for Folger Theatre  As I write this, we are about two weeks from our first audience for the Folger’s production of The Taming of the Shrew and I still have no real idea how to say Kate’s final speech without offending somebody! After almost twenty… Continue Reading »


The world increases, and kindreds are mightily strengthened

~by Lucretia Anderson In the olden days, families might sit around the parlor reading Shakespeare’s sonnets and plays together for the day’s entertainment. In 2012 we’re shaking it up! This past Saturday, Danielle Drakes and I had the privilege of working with an enthusiastic mix of 6-12 year olds and their parents in a workshop… Continue Reading »


World Shakespeare Festival Begins April 23rd!

The World Shakespeare Festival (WSF) starts April 23rd.  It  is a celebration of Shakespeare as the “world’s playwright.” The Royal Shakespeare Company is producing the event, which runs until the November. This event is an unprecedented collaboration with leading UK and international arts organizations. It’s the biggest celebration of Shakespeare ever staged. Approximately 60 partners will be coming together… Continue Reading »


@Hamlet: Twitter in the Classroom

The internet is a growing teaching resource and tool, especially when approaching Shakespeare and literature. Digital Theatre projects like Such Tweet Sorrow and Much Ado About N<3thing doubled as insights into familiar characters as well as cautionary tales regarding responsibility, communication, and cyber-bullying. We’ve discussed Twitter and Facebook’s influence on student–teacher communication before, but one teacher has… Continue Reading »


A Crime to Teach Shakespeare as We Do Now

Don’t be alarmed. My headline doesn’t apply to most of you who are followers of this Blog. And I don’t mean to malign or indict  other Shakespeare teachers. So please read on. That headline appeared in an article in the NY Times in 1916 on the 300th commemoration of Shakespeare’s death. Plans are already underway at the Folger… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare in other worlds

Shakespeare is taught all over the world, both in English-speaking and non-English speaking countries. Suzanne Worthington, RSC Education has created the World Shakespeare Classroom Wiki for the 2012 World Shakespeare Festival in London that looks at how Shakespeare is taught around the world.   Here are a few highlights: Algeria: Some students  from Ahmed Lamarchi High School discuss Shakespeare  and do a short… Continue Reading »


More to Fear from "No Fear"

By this point, you know what the Folger Education stance on ‘No Fear’ and Translated editions of Shakespeare’s plays is. Don’t use them – they’re not Shakespeare. (See Here, Here, and Here if you missed that message.) Pickens County public schools in South Carolina, USA, has given us another good reason not to use them:  Parents… Continue Reading »


SHAKESPEARE IS: A New Public Radio Series and Education Site

~by Robert Miller A new six-part public radio series, Shakespeare Is, will be broadcast nationwide in 2013. The series is being produced by two-time Peabody Award winner, Steve Rowland, (The Miles Davis Radio Project and Leonard Bernstein: An American Life) in conjunction with consulting producer David Chambers of the Yale School of Drama..  The series… Continue Reading »


“The Game’s Afoot; Follow Your Spirit!” (Henry V, III.1)

~by Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger There’s no reason students can’t have fun while learning! Part of Folger’s philosophy of “performance-based teaching” encourages students and teachers to play with the Shakespeare’s language and be actively engaged in creating meaning. What better way than to make it a game? I’ll mention that these all caught and kept… Continue Reading »


Modern Quills

“How far a modern quill doth come too short Speaking of worth, what worth in you doth grow” ~Sonnet 83 A few videos were sent our way this week (or were found by us and shared with the group), and though the content varies it seems that giving Shakespeare a modern voice is quite popular on the… Continue Reading »