Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Humanities-education

The Folger’s Philosophy of Teaching and Learning

The Folger Shakespeare Library is a hotbed of education staff, scholars, actors, directors, curators, librarians, docents, and digital geeks in Washington, DC, teamed up with teachers all over the country – in an endless collaboration focused on your teaching and your students’ learning. What do we believe about teaching and learning? Read on: 1. We… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Speaking Together

At the end of last week’s Teacher Tuesday, I shared a link to a video, Interpreting Shakespeare, with our Master Teacher Sue Biondo-Hench. In one section of the video, around 3:10, Sue breaks her students into groups to interpret and perform a single passage from Henry IV, part 1. They each interpret how performing one character’s… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Performing with Students

Inspired, today, by David Tennant‘s affirmation in the power of performing Shakespeare, today we’re rounding up some of our favorite Teacher to Teacher videos about performance in the classroom. Getting students on their feet is one of the most important things we stress about working with Shakespeare’s language – they are, after all, plays! What… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Teaching with Tech

The amount of new technology springing up around us can be dizzying, especially when our students are picking it up so quickly. Much of their daily life is conducted online – so how can our classrooms extend into that area of their life? In these Teacher to Teacher Videos, we’re highlighting some ways teachers are… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Techniques for Starting Shakespeare

For the next few weeks, we’ll be running a feature on one of our favorite online resources: our Teacher to Teacher videos! In these short clips, teachers share their favorite Shakespeare plays, ideas for teaching, and resources for the modern classroom. This week, let’s start generally with ideas for introducing your students to Shakespeare. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyqliiGJP6o&w=560&h=315] First… Continue Reading »


Ay, there's the point… over there.

Yesterday I stumbled upon this video from Australia’s ABC in 2011 about Shakespeare and his hip relevance to today’s audience. Excited, I started the video, and felt my face twist into a confused squint. A lot of their statements are great! Shakespeare was a great writer. His plays have survived for centuries. His language can… Continue Reading »


Censoring Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s plays are considered by many to be the pinnacle of high art – lovely language with high philosophy and idealized characters. But not everyone is ideal, and many words and turns of phrases are… well… not exactly dinner-table talk.  Shakespeare was writing to be entertaining, and his Elizabethan audience was just as entertained by… Continue Reading »


Owning Shakespeare's Words

One of the things we regularly like to see is students taking command of Shakespeare’s language as they say it. Showing us what the words mean to them, and making the character saying these words their own. That doesn’t always mean seeing a whole play exactly as Shakespeare wrote it. We’ve seen ownership take many… Continue Reading »


Extra Credit: Romeo and Juliet

After spending so much time in the original texts of Romeo and Juliet this month to compare them to the Fellowes’s adaptation (billed in ads as “Shakespeare’s,” hence the frustration), I went home to my very large shelf of Shakespearean adaptations to remind myself of some great examples of how that text has been explored in different ways…. Continue Reading »


Living With Folger Education

I first came to the Folger as a high school freshman participating in the Secondary School Shakespeare Festival. I was playing Dogberry, the lovable constable with a penchant for malapropism, in my high school Shakespeare Club’s abbreviated staging of Much Ado About Nothing. My first Festival was incredible – the extreme energy and love for… Continue Reading »