Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Humanities-education

My Teaching Epiphany: How to Really Prepare Students for Success

[getty src=”90797773?et=Sh9cJ1VSTepZcnrTaeJsgQ&sig=tZuxcdhxnOwZm7zw2RL6039_fvEN5trNZMXzVL7FJa0=” width=”359″ height=”478″] By Mark Miazga It’s January 6th and many people are celebrating epiphanies today. In keeping with this theme, I’m sharing with you a life-changing discovery I made in my own classroom: a teaching epiphany. I teach at a large urban public high school in Baltimore City, and, like many large public… Continue Reading »


What Julius Caesar Taught Me

by Sam Sherman Folger High School Fellow, Class of 2014 I don’t think I just speak for myself when I say that Shakespeare makes all the more sense when it is performed as opposed to it being examined from text. After all, Shakespeare wrote plays, not novels. Shakespeare wanted actors to play out his work… Continue Reading »


From the AV Vault: Interpreting Character

In honor of #ThrowBackThursday, we’re sharing one of the more popular videos from our Teaching Shakespeare series. Sue Biondo-Hench, a curriculum specialist (and alumna) of the Folger’s Teaching Shakespeare Institute and an English teacher at Carlisle High School for more than 29 years, often starts off a new Shakespeare unit by having students explore character and motive using… Continue Reading »


Bring Me to the Test: Assessment in the Secondary Shakespeare Classroom

[getty src=”166844918?et=R9TF3OgLSKV2hWE5Pgc-Tg&flyout=off&sig=1AeGK09p9-64Yjq1CxuiwiYfQZGI4raZmUyzNC8UBV0=” width=”507″ height=”338″] By Josh Cabat It happens every time I give a presentation on performance-based teaching or on using student-created projects to assess understanding of Shakespeare. After the session, two or three people come over to me privately and ask the same question. These sound like wonderful activities, they say, but how do… Continue Reading »


Dance to the Beat of Shakespeare

By David Fulco After-school programs find a way to weave themselves into the fabric of a school. At my school, all sixth and seventh grade students participate in after-school activities from 2:15-4:30pm, five days a week. It has been more than evident during the school day that students are not only enjoying their after-school activities, but also… Continue Reading »


Exploring "King Lear" as a Reader, Teacher, and Audience Member

By Dan Bruno King Lear, in its embodiment of the horrors of human existence, is the black hole at the center of the Shakespearean tragic universe, drawing in any sense of light and hope and keeping it from escaping. The big questions at the center of this play challenge us as human beings to confront a… Continue Reading »


What Sustains You As A Teacher?

Why is being a teacher worth it? What is it that draws you to the classroom? English teacher Rachel Ravreby Lintgen, a 1994 graduate of Amherst College in Massachusetts, gives her own answers to these important questions in a recent blog post. The Folger has a special connection to Amherst since the college is Henry Folger’s… Continue Reading »


Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt shares his first encounters with Shakespeare as a young student

Harvard University professor Stephen Greenblatt knows a lot about Shakespeare. He’s the author of “Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare,” and he came to the Folger Shakespeare Library this spring to participate in a research conference on “Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography.” But Greenblatt did not immediately latch on to the Bard in his student days. As he put it… Continue Reading »


My Maya Angelou Moment

[getty src=”74252590?et=LJRSUf9wRjxD_IXai2puKA&sig=BLSqP2TLiybg-JAw03dtid3Cs19qqQjPcxwnrC80vZs=” width=”479″ height=”643″] On a lovely spring afternoon in the late 1980’s or early 1990’s, I was sitting on one of the marble benches in front of the Folger Library. I was the Library’s head of education then, a high school English teacher from DC Public Schools creating and running the Library’s work for… Continue Reading »


Killing the Poet in your Classroom

by Gina Voskov One of the courses I teach at my school is 6th grade Humanities, and next up in our year’s curriculum plan is learning about Ancient Greece and Rome. I’m excited about getting the kids up and out of their seats for this class, and the best way I can do that is… Continue Reading »