Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Folger-library

Where to begin?

Last week I asked How Young is Too Young to start teaching Shakespeare? The few responses seemed to agree that it’s good to get younger students speaking the words early on, but not necessarily studying the plays. But where do you begin? Mike has stated earlier that the language is the best place to begin teaching Shakespeare… Continue Reading »


Turns of Phrase: The King James Bible

As we announced this spring, the Folger Shakespeare Library has partnered with Oxford University and the Harry Ransom Center to launch Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible. The project is chockfull of resources that educators may find useful (as well as relatable to studying Shakespeare), including information on the language… Continue Reading »


Where nothing wants that want itself doth seek…

Your school books are packed, the desks cleaned, the chalkboard (or smartboard) cleaner than it’s been since August. You close the books on another school year. We, too, are closing the books on the 2010-2011 school year, and we look forward to new faces, places, and things to try next year! As we prepare, we… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare as a Second Language

~by Holly Rodgers Educators often face the difficult task of engaging students who are increasingly distracted by the fast-paced technology driven society in which we live.  Although Elizabethan times moved at a slower pace, Shakespeare faced the same daunting challenge as teachers today, keeping the attention of such a diverse population. While Shakespeare’s audience differed more… Continue Reading »


Proof that Elementary Students Have FUN with Shakespeare!

Jennifer Ventimiglia’s classroom at Paul Public Charter School in Washington, DC is alive with literary inspiration in the form  of books, posters, and most importantly to us Shakespeare! Ms. Venti’s 6th grade English as a Second Language students have been studying Shakespeare all year long with our Shakespeare Steps Out  program. Beyond that they have… Continue Reading »


"For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring."

The temperature is going up and up and up these days, proof that summer is here even though school is still in session. Students are restless to be outside (or at least not at their desks), and I have a feeling the teachers are, too! If you’re looking for some Shakespeare class activities to fit… Continue Reading »


Teach Shakespeare – Before It's Too Late!

~by Barbara Cobb When I was starting my work on Shakespeare in the schools, I asked a cognitive psychologist with whom I collaborate, “at what age do children have the greatest facility with different dialects, like Shakespeare’s early modern English?” Her response surprised me just a little: “around the age of 9,” she said, “and… Continue Reading »


Summer and Shakespeare

“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” writes the Bard.  With summer approaching, we’re probably all thinking about spending some lazy days on the beach or in the backyard, enjoying being outside of the classroom and away from all of the administrative tasks that come with teaching.  While summer is a time for resting and recharging ourselves after… Continue Reading »


Kids doing Shakespeare

My apologies for the brief hiatus – last week was our 32nd Children’s Festival! 30 classes from DC, MD, VA (and even NY) came to perform on the Folger stage (on the set of Cyrano no less!), and brought incredible energy and life to Shakespeare’s plays. Kids love Shakespeare. There’s magic and poetry, violence and romance, and… Continue Reading »


In the beginning…of the King James Bible

Just as William Shakespeare’s life and work attract myths and speculation, the King James Bible has been privy to a number of legends and half-truths in its 400-year history. And like the works of Shakespeare, the King James Bible has had a profound influence on English-speaking peoples across the globe. The creation and influence of… Continue Reading »