Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Folger-library/folger-education-folger-library

Shakespeare Set Free Workshops

When teachers attend one of Folger Education’s Shakespeare Set Free  workshops, they are introduced to instructional strategies and activities for their classrooms that are designed to help students engage with Shakespeare’s language, build confidence in their ability to read and make meaning of the plays, and have fun while doing so.  Teachers actually do the… Continue Reading »


Which Imitates What?

Yesterday was our Theatre’s first rehearsal for Othello, where the non-Production staff of the Folger gets to learn what the upcoming production’s concept, design, and themes will look like. We can often see more of ourselves in our history than in a reflection of our present. This will not be a “modern-setting” Shakespeare where the men… Continue Reading »


A Storm of Words

The weather on the east coast has been particularly nasty this week. The wind blows, the lightning cracks, and the rain spit-spouts onto every surface. Soggy socks and gray skies can lead to bored students, though, but with a little help from Bill’s Buddies, I think I’ve found a way to make the weather more… Continue Reading »


The Moment it Clicks

We’ve been sharing here the many ways Shakespeare has changed or influenced our lives, and as a finale I wanted to share the moment Shakespeare first made sense to me. I’ve said many many times that the Animated Tales series from the BBC is what got me interested in Shakespeare, but that’s only part of… Continue Reading »


How Shakespeare Changed My Life

Director Melinda Hall has been working on a documentary on the subject of How Shakespeare Changed My Life. The promo clip featuring F. Murray Abraham, Sir Ben Kingsley, Stacy Keach, Michael Kahn and other noted Shakespeareans is currently circulating on the web. The most inspirational segment for me was Earle Hyman (whom I  remember as Bill Cosby’s dad… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare and the American Musical

At a recent Theatre Library Association conference, I had the good fortune to meet Irene Dash, author of Shakespeare and the American Musical (Indiana University Press, 2009).  I hadn’t heard of the book, so I asked for a copy to read.  It’s a good read.  To quote from the Coda, the book  “… addresses a… Continue Reading »


Reading Shakespeare Makes You Smarter?

An article by Robert McCrum of the The Observer, now a bit dated since it hails from April, scratches the surface of the idea that the process of reading Shakespeare ostensibly makes you smarter! Studies by Prof. Phillip Davis of Liverpool University have found through neurological analysis by MRI scanning that “functional shifts of syntax in Shakespeare… Continue Reading »


Where to begin?

Last week I asked How Young is Too Young to start teaching Shakespeare? The few responses seemed to agree that it’s good to get younger students speaking the words early on, but not necessarily studying the plays. But where do you begin? Mike has stated earlier that the language is the best place to begin teaching Shakespeare… Continue Reading »


Where nothing wants that want itself doth seek…

Your school books are packed, the desks cleaned, the chalkboard (or smartboard) cleaner than it’s been since August. You close the books on another school year. We, too, are closing the books on the 2010-2011 school year, and we look forward to new faces, places, and things to try next year! As we prepare, we… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare as a Second Language

~by Holly Rodgers Educators often face the difficult task of engaging students who are increasingly distracted by the fast-paced technology driven society in which we live.  Although Elizabethan times moved at a slower pace, Shakespeare faced the same daunting challenge as teachers today, keeping the attention of such a diverse population. While Shakespeare’s audience differed more… Continue Reading »