Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Activity-idea

#FolgerOfficeHours and The Winter's Tale

Last Thursday the Folger Education department took to Twitter for our second “office hours” session to talk with teachers about how they’re teaching Shakespeare. We love having an informal time to interact with you, answer your questions, and find out what your students are working on. Here’s a great question we received from James Evans: @FolgerED Creating resources for Winter's Tale…. Continue Reading »


A Sonnet for Shakespeare's Birthday Party

Each year, Folger Shakespeare Library invites students in grades 3 through 12 in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia to submit original sonnets for the annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Sonnet Contest. We are now taking submissions for this year’s contest, marking Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! All entries must follow Shakespearean sonnet form: 14 lines of iambic pentameter… Continue Reading »


How to convince your students that Shakespeare's language is accessible

During our first office hours on Twitter last week, we received this question: @FolgerED How does one get buy in through the language, when it’s a language irrelevant to modern pop culture?#folgerofficehours We needed to know more, of course . . . so the middle school teacher who had asked it clarified in a second tweet… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Creating Characters

Giving life to one of Shakespeare’s plays is as easy as speaking his words aloud. Actors, however, become their parts – making a human character breathe out of words on a page. You don’t have to be Derek Jacobi or Helen Mirren, though. To be a thoughtful actor, you just need to have an idea of… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Speaking Together

At the end of last week’s Teacher Tuesday, I shared a link to a video, Interpreting Shakespeare, with our Master Teacher Sue Biondo-Hench. In one section of the video, around 3:10, Sue breaks her students into groups to interpret and perform a single passage from Henry IV, part 1. They each interpret how performing one character’s… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Teaching with Tech

The amount of new technology springing up around us can be dizzying, especially when our students are picking it up so quickly. Much of their daily life is conducted online – so how can our classrooms extend into that area of their life? In these Teacher to Teacher Videos, we’re highlighting some ways teachers are… Continue Reading »


Teacher Tuesday: Techniques for Starting Shakespeare

For the next few weeks, we’ll be running a feature on one of our favorite online resources: our Teacher to Teacher videos! In these short clips, teachers share their favorite Shakespeare plays, ideas for teaching, and resources for the modern classroom. This week, let’s start generally with ideas for introducing your students to Shakespeare. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyqliiGJP6o&w=560&h=315] First… Continue Reading »


Owning Shakespeare's Words

One of the things we regularly like to see is students taking command of Shakespeare’s language as they say it. Showing us what the words mean to them, and making the character saying these words their own. That doesn’t always mean seeing a whole play exactly as Shakespeare wrote it. We’ve seen ownership take many… Continue Reading »


Grammatical Flourishes with Shakespeare

~by Emily DenBleyker I am not a teacher. I dropped my education major my first semester of college, and I have never looked back. And yet, somehow, in the funny way that life seems to happen to us, I ended up scheduled to teach a writing class for 8-10 year-olds at the day camp where… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare for Everyone: Working with Students with Severe Disabilities

~by Christopher Shamburg, New Jersey City University Shakespeare can be a powerful tool for the cognitive, emotional, social, and linguistic development of all kids. I saw this phenomenon when working with the students of A. Harry Moore School in Jersey City, a comprehensive school for students ages 3-21 with severe medical, physical, and cognitive disabilities…. Continue Reading »