Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts By: rgyoung

Shakespeare for Youngsters

Some recent posts on this blog have noted that introducing Shakespeare’s plays to young students can be a very successful experience for the students and their teachers.  In addition to the Folger’s program for students in grades 3-6, Shakespeare Steps Out (SSO), the RSC has been creating shorter versions of the plays for youngsters.  Last… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare and the Common Core Standards

Folger Education staff recently attended and presented workshops on teaching Shakespeare at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Convention in Chicago.  The convention celebrated the 100th birthday of NCTE, and it offered teachers in attendance many sessions that focused on the new Common Core State Standards set for implementation in schools from approximately 46 states… Continue Reading »


ANONYMOUS has arrived.

After the highly anticipated opening of ANONYMOUS last weekend (well, there were a few people I’m sure who almost had to wait on line to see it), the excitement has diminished significantly.  Two people I know were underwhelmed by the experience of seeing it.  My sense is that this is the reaction the vast majority… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare Set Free Workshops

When teachers attend one of Folger Education’s Shakespeare Set Free  workshops, they are introduced to instructional strategies and activities for their classrooms that are designed to help students engage with Shakespeare’s language, build confidence in their ability to read and make meaning of the plays, and have fun while doing so.  Teachers actually do the… Continue Reading »


Famous Actors/Famous Shakespeare Characters

Ralph Fiennes is taking on the role of Prospero in The Tempest.  As you may remember, Fiennes plays the role of Voldemort in the Harry Potter movies.  According to an interview he did for BBC Radio 4’s Front Row,  “He hopes young Potter fans, who are not usually interested in Shakespeare, could be drawn to the… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare Really Did Change My Life

Lucretia’s blog about how Shakespeare changed her life  has prompted me to write my own entry about how Shakespeare changed mine.  Like most students, I was introduced to Shakespeare in high school.  We studied Macbeth and had to memorize a passage from it to deliver in front of the class.  I still remember the passage… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare and the American Musical

At a recent Theatre Library Association conference, I had the good fortune to meet Irene Dash, author of Shakespeare and the American Musical (Indiana University Press, 2009).  I hadn’t heard of the book, so I asked for a copy to read.  It’s a good read.  To quote from the Coda, the book  “… addresses a… Continue Reading »


"I must be cruel only to be kind." (Hamlet, 3.4.199)

I attended a conference in New York recently on teaching Shakespeare where teachers reported on the outcomes of  using performance-based teaching techniques with their students.  They reported that students made pretty significant academic gains based on the work they were doing in class.  However, the teachers also reported that the teachers their students had the following year did… Continue Reading »


You're Never Too Young to "Speak the speech"

A recent blog entry by Caitlin Griffin asked how young is too young to start reading Shakespeare.  We’ve worked with students from third grade through high school, but we do know of one school system, the Denver Public School System, that has students from kindergarten through high school actively engaged in speaking Shakespeare’s text.  The… Continue Reading »