Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts By: Folger Education

Is It Midsummer Yet?

OK, we know it’s not technically summer yet, and it’s totally not midsummer, but we can’t help but rush right into summer dreaming—and reading—especially on the warm, sunny days we’re currently enjoying in DC! Perhaps some of you are already thinking about new ways—or plays—to teach next year. As you spend some time this summer… Continue Reading »


High Schoolers as Scholars and Artists? Yes!

Today, June 1st, is the deadline for students to apply to become Lily McKee High School Fellows of the Folger! Like all Folger Education programs, this experience immerses learners in scholarship, performance, literacy, and our collection. Learn more in this throwback post by past fellow Mikaela Ruiz-Ramon from October 2014: Why I Love the High School… Continue Reading »


Who’s Sharing Their Shakespeare Stories?

  Students, teachers, and Shakespeare enthusiasts all over the world are posting their Shakespeare stories with #MySHX400. Check out this sampling, and then create your own!   Writer and director Joss Whedon shares his Shakespeare story about filming “Much Ado About Nothing” at his house. A McKee High School Fellow shares his first encounter with… Continue Reading »


What’s Your Shakespeare Story?

  To celebrate the magic that happens in classrooms and the joys of connecting with Shakespeare 400 years after his death, the Folger invites you and your students to share your personal experiences with Shakespeare—all on video. WHAT HAPPENS: Your students—and you—share your personal Shakespeare stories by making short videos and sharing them using #MySHX400…. Continue Reading »


Who Just Declared Their Love for Teachers on International TV?

Loads of smart, famous people, that’s who. What’s more, the program wasn’t even really supposed to be about teaching or school. It was about Shakespeare. But—no big surprise here—it seems that for many actors, community leaders, students, teachers, artists, and scholars, “Shakespeare” and “school” go together like “Romeo” and “Juliet.” What are we talking about?… Continue Reading »


“Happy Birthday, Will! Thanks for Making Me Use My Brain!” (and More Texts from Your Classrooms)

There’s been a lot of buzz lately around the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, which we commemorated on April 23, 2016. (Yes: tradition says that poor Will died on his birthday in 1616.) Last week we invited you—teachers and students everywhere—to text Shakespeare your birthday wishes, and the responses were honey-tongued, well-wishing, and OVERWHELMING! And… Continue Reading »


“William’s My Man… Your Books Still Poppin’!” (and Other Awesome Texts from Your Classrooms)

Thank you, teachers and students everywhere, for texting Will Shakespeare your fabulous birthday messages! We’re sharing a few today on this blog and on Twitter (@FolgerEd), and we’ll even read some more on The Wonder of Will LIVE, our live streaming event on CSPAN2 and Folger.edu… taking place on the big day itself, April 23rd!… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare on Testing

Whether it’s the PARCC, Smarter Balanced, IB, AP, or another high-stakes assessment, we know lots of you and your students have testing on the brain… which is why we thought you might enjoy reading a few lines from Shakespeare, all on the subject of—what else?—tests. The word “test” appears 4 times in Shakespeare’s works:  … Continue Reading »


What a Festival!

Big thanks to everyone who made this year’s 9-day Secondary School Shakespeare Festival a total blast! Enjoy these photos of Festival goers from all kinds of classrooms in all kinds of schools all over the DC area. O joyful days!    


4 Reasons to Use the Web in a Shakespeare Unit

Don’t get us wrong. We love—like, love—paper. We’re a rare book library, after all. We’re crazy for the codex! At the same time, we’re excited about all that the digital realm is doing for readers, teachers, students, and lovers of language. Here are 4 reasons to integrate technology in your language-based, performance-rich Shakespeare unit. Teaching… Continue Reading »