Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts By: Folger Education

Tech Tips: Creating Shakespeare Radio Plays

[getty src=”102754951?et=vk6vTSb6Q4N5_oBP76Uhkw&similar=off&sig=pGWSDl6IMD8DCdtz7Pqq67-ZR9upqOfK7wQVfj2Vj1g=” width=”507″ height=”338″] By Dana Huff Act IV, Scene 1 of Macbeth is great fun: the three witches are brewing a “hell-broth” which they will use to conjure the apparitions that talk to Macbeth. The scene contains some of the most memorable lines of the play and lends itself well to choral reading activities…. Continue Reading »


Dance to the Beat of Shakespeare

By David Fulco After-school programs find a way to weave themselves into the fabric of a school. At my school, all sixth and seventh grade students participate in after-school activities from 2:15-4:30pm, five days a week. It has been more than evident during the school day that students are not only enjoying their after-school activities, but also… Continue Reading »


Why I Love the High School Fellowship Program

We often feature the voices of teachers on this blog. But today, we hear from a student… By Mikaela Ruiz-Ramon The Folger Shakespeare Library High School Fellowship Program is a 3 month-long course offered to Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area high school students. I am part of a group of 16 Fellows that meets every week… Continue Reading »


Teaching Shakespeare: Mini-Research Projects

By Deborah Gascon I set a goal this school year to include several, less time-consuming (but equally as meaningful), mini-research projects into my teaching of literature. Enter resident experts! This quick strategy to get students researching more frequently scaffolds the skills they need to complete the big, scary research paper we assign in the spring. The… Continue Reading »


Using Film Clips to Teach Shakespeare

By Chris Lavold If you are a fan of Folger Education, you are well aware of the focus on performance-based teaching and how getting kids up on their feet is an effective way to understand and appreciate Shakespeare’s plays. I have found that an excellent complement to this is to view film clips of performances… Continue Reading »


"The Adventures of Batlet Hamman" and Other Wild Ideas: Shakespeare and Pop Culture

[getty src=”71144558?et=qYiaoUryT9BYRcIU18zAGQ&similar=off&sig=2U6oMC6WOq15_YcCrAPymReujxll6JohSdxFVoDJ8G4=” width=”445″ height=”357″] By Sara Lehn Last year an unforgettable group of my twelfth grade students became fascinated with the connections they saw between Batman and Hamlet.  At first I was skeptical, but the more they defended their beliefs, the more I came around to their way of thinking. Consider: an angry, morose member… Continue Reading »


Letting Shakespeare Speak for Himself

By Mike Klein Year after year kids in my classroom have strikingly similar reactions to my announcement, “Tomorrow, we’ll be starting Shakespeare.” That reaction is usually a series of “Ughs,” or “Oh nos!” or “Whys?” The most dreaded by English teachers everywhere is, of course, “I hate Shakespeare!” Perhaps I am different, perhaps I’m a… Continue Reading »



Exploring "King Lear" as a Reader, Teacher, and Audience Member

By Dan Bruno King Lear, in its embodiment of the horrors of human existence, is the black hole at the center of the Shakespearean tragic universe, drawing in any sense of light and hope and keeping it from escaping. The big questions at the center of this play challenge us as human beings to confront a… Continue Reading »


Fairy Wings: Shakespeare in the South Bronx

By David A. Fulco “When are we getting our costumes?” It was the third day of my after-school program—Drama (what the kids called it)/Theater (what the school called it)/Shakespeare Troupe (what I called it)—and the kids were getting antsy. Relying heavily on my class with Caleen Jennings during the 2014 Teaching Shakespeare Institute, I had… Continue Reading »