Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Tagged: Shakespeare Set Free

Relays: They Aren’t Just for Runners

By Greta Brasgalla   As a “veteran” teacher in my 22nd year of teaching, I sometimes look back at how I used to teach when I first started. It makes me cringe. And the teaching materials I used? Of course, I don’t have any of them because they are outdated and irrelevant.   And then… Continue Reading »

Inside the Classroom: Do Modern “Translations” of Shakespeare Have a Place in the Classroom?

By Gina Voskov NYC teacher and Folger National Teacher Corps member Gina Voskov is back with the second installment in her series “Inside the Classroom,” which takes us into her middle school classroom during a Shakespeare unit. Today, we hear Gina’s perspective as teacher, and Thursday, we’ll hear from her students. You can read the… Continue Reading »

Inside the Classroom: Students Share How They Really Feel about Starting a Shakespeare Unit

In this special series we’re calling “Inside the Classroom,” we’ll follow middle school teacher Gina Voskov and her students as they embark on a Twelfth Night unit. Today, it’s all about pre-reading—check back for notes from the group throughout the learning process. By: Gina Voskov I am so pleased to introduce Won Jae, Lois, and Alexandra,… Continue Reading »

Creative Midterms: Assessing Process and Performance

By Jill Burdick-Zupancic   Midterms. This word always evokes a bit of panic in my mind. It feels like some kind of “super assessment” I’m expected to give to my students. Even in my seventh year as an educator, it’s a jarring word; however, the past three years, since my experience at the Teaching Shakespeare Institute… Continue Reading »

Breaking Down the Barriers of Shakespeare’s Text

Happy holidays, readers! We’ll be on hiatus until January 6, 2015. Check back then for a new post—and have a very merry winter break!   By Sara Lehn    Occasionally, those of us who revere the Bard speak of his works as if they are some sort of holy text. These plays contain such incredible… Continue Reading »

Dance to the Beat of Shakespeare

By David Fulco After-school programs find a way to weave themselves into the fabric of a school. At my school, all sixth and seventh grade students participate in after-school activities from 2:15-4:30pm, five days a week. It has been more than evident during the school day that students are not only enjoying their after-school activities, but also… Continue Reading »

Letting Shakespeare Speak for Himself

By Mike Klein Year after year kids in my classroom have strikingly similar reactions to my announcement, “Tomorrow, we’ll be starting Shakespeare.” That reaction is usually a series of “Ughs,” or “Oh nos!” or “Whys?” The most dreaded by English teachers everywhere is, of course, “I hate Shakespeare!” Perhaps I am different, perhaps I’m a… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare and Performance-Based Assessment

As you may have guessed, we never get tired of reading about the creative ways teachers are using performance-based learning techniques to teach Shakespeare. Sarah Goodis-Orenstein, a middle school language arts teacher and department head in a public charter school in Brooklyn, recently shared in a blog post on Education Week how she’s experimented with the Folger’s Shakespeare… Continue Reading »

“Take heed, ere summer comes:” Teaching Romeo and Juliet Intensive

Guest post by Michael Klein It didn’t take me long to rethink how to look at Shakespeare texts after listening to Dr. Ann Cook Calhoun compare them to a musical score. “Reading texts sitting at a desk is like looking at musical notations without hearing the instruments” she said during the English-Speaking Union’s Shakespeare Teacher… Continue Reading »

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