Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeare/history

James Shapiro and The Year of Lear

By Folger Education   Last week, the Folger hosted a book launch for our colleague James Shapiro’s The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606. Shapiro, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and member of the Folger Board of Governors, discussed how the tumultuous events in England in 1606 affected Shakespeare and shaped the… Continue Reading »

About a Book

A few weeks ago, I had the chance to participate in a printing workshop at Folger using a replica of a printing press like the ones used in Shakespeare’s time. The invention and popularity of the printing press changed the way books were produced, increasing the output and cutting the cost of making a book…. Continue Reading »

The Folios Are Coming! The Folios Are Coming!

By Michael LoMonico One week ago, we announced the selected cities for the Traveling Tour of First Folios, and it was immediately posted on Facebook. Within a few days, there were nearly 200 comments. We were amazed at the ecstatic reactions. Here are some of the best: Finally, I’ll get to see one. It’s been… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare Uncovered Returns on PBS

  The second season of Shakespeare Uncovered begins on January 30th.  The Folger has been asked to work with WNET THIRTEEN to create support material for teachers and their students. I’ve been lucky to have seen the series already and want to share some of the highlights with you. Hugh Bonneville and Ralph Fiennes on Performing… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare in American Life: Bringing American History into the English Classroom

[getty src=”167447077?et=_yXIZdIbRb507qdWa7nV9A&sig=O8Gp4Zd3wQ0kD41Bmk7N8RuHpYNfaBB7EJ5m-vZAtaw=” width=”507″ height=”387″] With the Fourth of July holiday weekend behind us, many teachers are turning again to the task of curriculum-building for the upcoming school year and thinking about ways to get this fresh batch of students interested in studying Shakespeare. Consider how it came to be that Americans over the centuries have so heartily… Continue Reading »

Richard III: Science class meets history class meets English class

Until earlier this fall, I was clearly the one in love with words, literature, classrooms, teachers’ lounges, theatre.  Math and science not so much.  OK, so my grade in Biology as a college freshman was D.  Not so interested in photosynthesis. Still not the least bit interested in photosynthesis, but now I am crazily interested… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare the Player

Last night, I sat in on the first preview for Folger Theatre’s new production of Twelfth Night. The romantic, knotty nature of the play was brought out in the production, and I, along with the rest of the very packed house, found myself enjoying the whole play anew. And then Feste (for not many companies cast a… Continue Reading »

The Power of Language

Shakespeare’s England was not overseen by a democratic government. Monarchs ruled for life, and successors were chosen based on royal bloodlines or who won which war. Despite this, Shakespeare knew that the public’s perception of a monarch went a long way towards the success of their reign. He gave his characters the power of language… Continue Reading »

Celebrating Queen Elizabeth II

The Anglophiles among you may have spent the morning watching (or streaming) the live coverage of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee Celebration. The reigning monarch of Britain has spent 60 years on the throne, and is still beloved and revered by her subjects. Shakespeare’s own Queen Elizabeth (the first of that name), was one of… Continue Reading »

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