Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Posts Categorized: Shakespeare-lit

James Shapiro and The Year of Lear

By Folger Education   Last week, the Folger hosted a book launch for our colleague James Shapiro’s The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606. Shapiro, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and member of the Folger Board of Governors, discussed how the tumultuous events in England in 1606 affected Shakespeare and shaped the… Continue Reading »

The Folios Are Coming! The Folios Are Coming!

By Michael LoMonico One week ago, we announced the selected cities for the Traveling Tour of First Folios, and it was immediately posted on Facebook. Within a few days, there were nearly 200 comments. We were amazed at the ecstatic reactions. Here are some of the best: Finally, I’ll get to see one. It’s been… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare and Young Adult Fiction

Novels can help engage students not only with Shakespeare’s language (as we discussed in Tuesday’s blog post about That Shakespeare Kid) but also with his characters and stories. With spring break coming up, maybe your students will be interested in a little light reading that also keeps them thinking about the Bard. Drawing on some suggestions that… Continue Reading »

That Shakespeare Kid: "Bethumped with words"

We have teachers ask us all the time how to introduce Shakespeare’s language in a way that’s engaging to students. One possible approach: young adult novels that weave the Bard’s words along with the kind of dialogue familiar to students. “That Shakespeare Kid,” by Folger Education’s senior consultant Michael LoMonico, presents just this combination. Fourteen-year-old Emma narrates… Continue Reading »

Extra Credit: Romeo and Juliet

After spending so much time in the original texts of Romeo and Juliet this month to compare them to the Fellowes’s adaptation (billed in ads as “Shakespeare’s,” hence the frustration), I went home to my very large shelf of Shakespearean adaptations to remind myself of some great examples of how that text has been explored in different ways…. Continue Reading »

Summer Reading

We’ve told you plenty about our new favorite books: How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare and A Horse with Wings, both of which were featured presentations by the authors during our Conference on Teaching Shakespeare in the Elementary Classroom this week. Now that you’re in “summer-mode,” though, maybe you’d prefer a little something more to explore your… Continue Reading »

A Horse With Wings

A Horse With Wings is a new children’s book that introduces children to Shakespeare by having characters from his plays sing songs. The journey from  the idea to create the book and its completion is an interesting one.   A few years ago, Daeshin Kim and his wife, Sohyun An,  moved their family from Los Angeles… Continue Reading »

Osmotically Speaking: Shakespeare as Writing Teacher

On more than one occasion, students in my Shakespeare class have told me that studying Shakespeare has made them better writers. That thought pleases and intrigues me, and it also inspired me to offer my students a writing challenge. I asked each one to write in a genre of his/her own choosing and to allow… Continue Reading »

Why, what read you there?

I loved summer reading lists. Not that I loved being assigned homework over the summer, but it was a list of books I was now considered “ready” to read! The Hobbit after 5th grade, Shabanu into 8th, Jane Eyre into 9th… I was introduced (or re-introduced) to some excellent literature, which I could take with me to… Continue Reading »

Not Much Ado about Much Ado…

Recently the internet was abuzz with excitement over a secretly produced film of Much Ado About Nothing directed by Joss Whedon. Mostly, probably, because it’s one of the most well-loved nerds ever directing a cast of a few more of the most well-loved nerds. I excitedly shared this information with my High School Fellowship mentees the… Continue Reading »

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