Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Monthly Archives: March 2014

Shakespeare Made Just As Easy

A while back I wrote Shakespeare in Other Words citing the reasons teachers should avoid using “No Fear” or “Made Easy” or any other parallel text edition in their classroom. Needless to say, it generated over 40 comments, including some from an author of “The Shakespeare Novels.” But now I realize that simply dismissing those books wasn’t enough…. Continue Reading »

Office Hours? Thanks in advance for your advice . . . .

Last December, we led a Master Class on teaching Romeo and Juliet, streamed live from the public television studio we have tucked inside our building.  Six hundred of you joined us, asked questions and made comments on the air, and lit up the chat box during the hour.  A whole bunch of you were kind enough… Continue Reading »

Featured Lesson Plan: The Bullies and the Bullied in Shakespeare's Plays

Today we’re featuring a lesson plan from among the highest rated teaching modules on our website. It’s written by Kevin J. Costa, a 2010 Teaching Shakespeare Institute alum and an English teacher at McDonogh School in Owings Mills, MD, where he also serves as Director of Fine & Performing Arts. Read Costa’s introduction to this… Continue Reading »

How to create your own Shakespeare festival

Last week we wrapped up our annual Secondary School Shakespeare Festival. Students from close to 50 local schools performed 25-minute scenes from Shakespeare plays onstage at the Folger in front of their peers. (You can see some photos and tweets at #FolgerFest. A lot of fun had by all!) Now we’re getting ready for our Children’s… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare and Young Adult Fiction

Novels can help engage students not only with Shakespeare’s language (as we discussed in Tuesday’s blog post about That Shakespeare Kid) but also with his characters and stories. With spring break coming up, maybe your students will be interested in a little light reading that also keeps them thinking about the Bard. Drawing on some suggestions that… Continue Reading »

That Shakespeare Kid: "Bethumped with words"

We have teachers ask us all the time how to introduce Shakespeare’s language in a way that’s engaging to students. One possible approach: young adult novels that weave the Bard’s words along with the kind of dialogue familiar to students. “That Shakespeare Kid,” by Folger Education’s senior consultant Michael LoMonico, presents just this combination. Fourteen-year-old Emma narrates… Continue Reading »

Common Core standing tall onstage at the Folger

Let’s make a date for another day to have a longer, more nuanced conversation about the many parts of the Common Core. For now, I just want to say that if we could put politics aside and testing aside (and unfortunately, in our beloved field of education, we can put aside neither for long), the… Continue Reading »

Resources for the Shakespeare plays YOU are teaching

Last week, we took a reader poll to ask which Shakespeare plays were being taught this semester. Top of the list (as of this writing): Romeo and Juliet, with more than 25 percent of the vote. Macbeth took second place with 22 percent, and Hamlet third with 10 percent. Our write-in option was also quite… Continue Reading »