Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Monthly Archives: February 2014

#FolgerOfficeHours and The Winter's Tale

Last Thursday the Folger Education department took to Twitter for our second “office hours” session to talk with teachers about how they’re teaching Shakespeare. We love having an informal time to interact with you, answer your questions, and find out what your students are working on. Here’s a great question we received from James Evans: @FolgerED Creating resources for Winter's Tale…. Continue Reading »

Teaching Shakespeare Institute: boot camp for English teachers

We could tell you all about the Folger’s Teaching Shakespeare Institute–the intensity and rigor of our classes, the practical techniques that go on to prove their worth in the classroom over and over, the fun times and good memories with other like-minded teachers who becoming lifelong friends. But we’ll let some of our alumni tell you about their… Continue Reading »

The 'why' and 'how' of teaching sonnets

Earlier this week, we invited you to share our sonnet-writing contest with your students. And we hope you do! Why teach Shakespeare’s sonnets? Exploring Shakespeare’s sonnets can be a good way to introduce students to his language. Many ideas and themes in the sonnets also appear in Shakespeare’s plays and can be useful lead-ins. For… Continue Reading »

A Sonnet for Shakespeare's Birthday Party

Each year, Folger Shakespeare Library invites students in grades 3 through 12 in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia to submit original sonnets for the annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Sonnet Contest. We are now taking submissions for this year’s contest, marking Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! All entries must follow Shakespearean sonnet form: 14 lines of iambic pentameter… Continue Reading »

Richard III: Science class meets history class meets English class

Until earlier this fall, I was clearly the one in love with words, literature, classrooms, teachers’ lounges, theatre.  Math and science not so much.  OK, so my grade in Biology as a college freshman was D.  Not so interested in photosynthesis. Still not the least bit interested in photosynthesis, but now I am crazily interested… Continue Reading »