Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Monthly Archives: November 2013

Teacher Tuesday: Creating Characters

Giving life to one of Shakespeare’s plays is as easy as speaking his words aloud. Actors, however, become their parts – making a human character breathe out of words on a page. You don’t have to be Derek Jacobi or Helen Mirren, though. To be a thoughtful actor, you just need to have an idea of… Continue Reading »

Dykstra Blog: The Student Matinee Experience!

reposted with permission from the Folger Theatre Blog “Grumble, Grumble.” “Snort” “Whine” “Complaint” “But it’s soooo eeeearly!” “This is ungodly.” “Oh, no…I’m going to need a nap!” “Is there coffee?” And so it goes… It’s a student matinee of our Romeo and Juliet at the Folger Theatre and our call is practically the butt crack of dawn. We have… Continue Reading »

Teacher Tuesday: Speaking Together

At the end of last week’s Teacher Tuesday, I shared a link to a video, Interpreting Shakespeare, with our Master Teacher Sue Biondo-Hench. In one section of the video, around 3:10, Sue breaks her students into groups to interpret and perform a single passage from Henry IV, part 1. They each interpret how performing one character’s… Continue Reading »

Team Folger Heads to Boston

Team Folger will once again have a major presence at next week’s NCTE Conference in Boston. If you’re planning on attending be sure to take part in all of our activities and add a comment below to let us know to look out for you. Here’s what’s on: The Booth Stop by to see a demo… Continue Reading »

Teacher Tuesday: Performing with Students

Inspired, today, by David Tennant‘s affirmation in the power of performing Shakespeare, today we’re rounding up some of our favorite Teacher to Teacher videos about performance in the classroom. Getting students on their feet is one of the most important things we stress about working with Shakespeare’s language – they are, after all, plays! What… Continue Reading »

Teacher Tuesday: Picking a Play

We know that Shakespeare wrote at least 37 plays – though not all of them are taught in our classrooms. We love teaching the recognizable and easily-found Hamlet, Midsummer, Othello, and Macbeth, but there are so many to choose from if you have the time and the inclination to dig deeper. In this week’s Teacher to Teacher videos,… Continue Reading »