Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Monthly Archives: February 2011

Spontaneous Shakespeare

I have heard of street performers (sometimes students) erupting into Shakespearean soliloquies in public places either as advertisement for a performance, as guerrilla art, or as an assignment. Unfortunately, youtube is lacking in the latter category. Street Shakespeare is a project that intrigues me greatly, mainly because it is so out of context and could… Continue Reading »

Macbeth Set Free

Folger Education entered  new territory on Tuesday February 15 with the beginning of Macbeth Set Free, an online course for teachers. With the help of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and New York Institute of Technology, we are able to reach teachers across the country with some solid approaches for teaching Shakespeare…. Continue Reading »

Shakespeare's Poetry: Venus and Adonis

As we all know, Shakespeare’s work entails more than just his theatrical accomplishments; he was a published poet even as he penned his well-known plays. In times when the playhouses were closed due to contagious illness, Shakespeare was able to find a patron (Henry Wriothsley, Earl of Southampton) who paid well for his poetry, and,… Continue Reading »

Shakespeare and comics?

~by Conor McCreery I’m pretty sure I know what you’re thinking; you’re thinking: FINALLY! Finally someone has put together a medium and a creative genius that work together even better than chocolate and peanut butter.  No, I’m not kidding. Shakespeare was always meant to be seen. His plays have a special mix of magic and… Continue Reading »

More Than Papier-Mâché Characters

~by Anthony Del Col The best Shakespeare production I’ve ever seen was also the worst. A friend of mine was doing a community theatre production of Titus Andronicus years ago and it was quite bad (with the exception of my friend, who may be reading this… oops!).  Bad acting, directing, sets, costumes and props (a… Continue Reading »

Is It Harder To Act Shakespeare?

Folger Theatre presented the first of its four matinee performances of The Comedy of Errors for students today.  As we have in the past, students were invited to participate in a talk-back with the actors following the performance.  One of the students asked the cast whether or not it was harder to act Shakespeare than… Continue Reading »

“How well he's read, to reason against reading!”

~by Jennifer Ventimiglia As King Ferdinand speaks of Biron in Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost, sometimes those of us in the education field also use “reasoning” to keep kids from “reading,” in this case, Shakespeare himself.  Administrators might “reason” that students need to be preparing for state-wide assessments and that there is no space in the… Continue Reading »