Teaching Shakespeare!

A Folger Education Blog

Monthly Archives: May 2010

Elementary Shakespeare on Screen

There’s a technology wave sweeping the way elementary students learn and present Shakespeare. Wrapping up the children’s festival here at the Folger reaffirms our belief that performing Shakespeare live  is a very visceral and accessible approach to experiencing his plays. But what about introducing Shakespeare through film technology? Not just by vieiwing it but becoming a… Continue Reading »

Finding Love for the Oft-Overlooked

Another season of student festivals is behind us, and with it, another hearty showing of all the Shakespeare favorites: Romeo and Juliet and Midsummer Night’s Dream always have a loyal following (you just can’t beat a good Pyramus and Thisbe), Macbeth and Hamlet continue to be crowd pleasers, and Twelfth Night and Winter’s Tale are hot new… Continue Reading »

Movies and Shakespeare

Caitlin responded to my recent blog entry on summer reading and movie going by sending me this link:  http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.reelzchannel.com%2Farticle%2F1028%2Ftop-10-shook-up-shakespeare-movies&h=1f844. The site highlights ten movies based on Shakespeare’s plays, including Othello, King Lear, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. With tonight’s opening of Letters to Juliet, the list grows.  Are there any missing?  What’s your favorite?

Shakespeare and Summer: Reading a good book or watching a good movie

Recent blogs have focused on books or movies based on Shakespeare’s plays.  A book by Suzanne Harper, The Juliet Club, was just released in paperback, in time for summer reading.  A new film Letters to Juliet,  opens in movie theaters this Friday.  The book has gotten some good reviews.  The movie trailer looks promising.  Another book, The… Continue Reading »

Who Wrote Shakespeare?

In an earlier post on Jim Shapiro’s new book, Contested Will,  I noted that it had gotten very good press.  It’s a great read, accessible and engaging.  Shapiro examines the underlying issues surrounding the authorship question.  As Shapiro notes, for two hundred years after his death, no one questioned Shakespeare’s authorship of the plays.  Now there… Continue Reading »